FAQs

 

Q: What is EMTALA?                                                                                                                                                                                    

EMTALA is the Federal Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act, also known as COBRA or the Patient Anti-Dumping Law. EMTALA requires most hospitals to provide an examination and needed stabilizing treatment, without consideration of insurance coverage or ability to pay, when a patient presents to an emergency room for attention to an emergency medical condition. Please www.emtala.com for more information.

 

Q: What is the 250-yard rule?                                                                                                                                                                     

In regards to EMTALA, a patient who presented to a facility’s emergency department (or on their campus) requesting treatment, or who appeared and was perceived to be in need of treatment, had to be provided with the medical screening examination prescribed under EMTALA, and provided with stabilizing medical treatment if an emergency medical condition is found.

“Campus means the physical area immediately adjacent to the provider’s main buildings, other areas and structures that are not strictly contiguous to the main buildings but are located within 250 yards of the main buildings, and any other areas determined on an individual case basis, by the HCFA regional office, to be part of the provider’s campus.”

Patients presenting within this 250 yards must receive a medical screening examination in the facility's emergency department before transport to a secondary facility (if needed based on the emergency medical condition presenting).

For more information on the 250-yard rule click on http://www.emtala.com/faq.html

 

Q: Can you provide guidance on when CPR should or shouldn't be started by EMS personnel?

Please review page 3, letter B of the DNR Law changes memo issued by the Department of Health for some guidelines "Requirements Applicable for prehospital personnel". Remember every scene is unique and good clinical judgment with medical control consultation followed by documentation is a must. DNR Law changes memo [ pdf ]

Frequently Asked Question Regarding New York State EMS Certification

Q: How do I get a replacement certification card in case mine is lost or destroyed?

You must submit a signed written request that includes your social security number, date of birth and current mailing address to the Certification Unit of the Bureau of EMS at 875 Central Avenue, Albany NY 12206. You may also fax your request to (518) 402-0985.
E-mailed requests cannot be honored as the request must include your signature.

Q: How do I change the name on my NYS Certification?

You must submit a signed written request that includes your social security number, date of birth and current mailing address to the Certification Unit of the Bureau of EMS at the above address indicating the name as it appears on your current certification and the name you wish it to be changed to. This request should also indicate your NYS EMS Certificate number. This request may also be submitted by fax at the above number.
As indicated above E-mailed requests cannot be honored as the request must include your signature.

Q: How long is my NYS certification valid for?

Normally your certificate is valid for 37 months from the last day of the month that you passed your certification examination.

 

Q: I have taken my NYS written examination, how long will it take to obtain my results and certification and can I find my results on the web?

Your results will arrive in four to six weeks. Do not call the Bureau of EMS or your EMS area office as the results are not available to you over the phone under any circumstances and they are not posted on the web. You must have your card in hand before you can start practicing.

Q: Can I get an extension if my card expires and I am enrolled in a course?

No, Your certification can only be extended if you took your NYS written examination prior to the expiration of your certification and are awaiting your new certificate.

Q: Can I obtain Reciprocity in New York State if I am a Nationally Registered EMT or Paramedic?

No, You can only obtain reciprocity from another state or approved U.S. Military program. You may still apply with your national registry and you will be issued a letter that allows you to enroll in a NYS Refresher Course.

Q: How do I register for On Site Scoring?

You can call 1-800-628-0193. Be sure to have your course number and student Identification number when you call.

Q: How do I reschedule taking my state written certification examination?

As above you call 1-800-628-0193. Be sure to have your course number and student Identification number when you call.

Q: How do I obtain a letter verifying that my certification is valid or that I completed a NYS EMS course for an employer or college?

Submit a signed request to the Certification unit at the above address please remember to include your social security number, date of birth and current mailing address. As with other requests these may not be submitted by E-mail.

Q: I want to become certified but I have a criminal conviction, what do I need to do?

The Bureau of EMS will not clear an individual for certification until they have enrolled in an EMS course. Once an unsigned application is submitted, you will be contacted by a Bureau of EMS Representative to obtain information from you regarding your conviction. It is recommended you review Bureau of EMS Policy Statement 15-04 Certification of Individuals with Criminal Convictions  for additional information.